One Night Only! Legendary French Film 'The Mother and the Whore' 7 p.m. Sunday at Belcourt

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Oh hell yes. From this week's Scene:

Jean Eustache's black-and-white 215-minute magnum opus [The Mother and the Whore] closed the coffin lid on both the French student idealism of 1968 and the fragmented Nouvelle Vague. Eustache follows a burned-out student activist, Alexandre (Truffaut/Godard alter ego Jean-Pierre Léaud, cast as a slap in the masters' faces), as he mooches off one indulgent lover, Marie (Bernadette Lafont), and pursues another, the promiscuous nurse Veronika (Francoise Lebrun). In apartments, cafés and uneasy three-ways, the principals chatter their lives and hopes away, and their conversations are as raw and bitterly sad as the one night of your life you'd most like to forget.

Every bleeding moment of bad sex and talk, talk, talk appears ripped from firsthand experience, and its despair lends a cruel logic to Eustache's suicide in 1981. Yet there's something heroic in the movie’s unrelenting despondency. Today, this looks like either the most conservative work of radical art ever released, or the most radical work of conservative art. Either way, it's a resounding blow to the heart. Thank The Belcourt and the French consulate for their efforts in this rare one-time screening, arranged at the request of guest programmer Harmony Korine — even haters would have to admit he’s one hell of a curator. In French with subtitles.

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