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Sandra Collins ♦ Saturday, 6/23

Thursday, 21st

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One of the best-known and most talented DJs on the electronica scene, Collins will be headlining local promoter the Electric Lounge’s “New Frontiers” show at 328 Performance Hall. Though she’s often referred to as the “Trance Goddess,” Collins insists that she plays more than just trance. She’s had long residencies at some of electronica’s top clubs, among them L.A.’s King, Sketchpad, and Metropolis and New York’s Twilo, where she’ll be performing immediately before coming to Nashville. She recently DJed in a Coca-Cola commercial and has shared bills with electronica superstars such as Sasha, John Digweed, Paul van Dyk, and Carl Cox. At the 328 show—one of the biggest local events of its kind in recent memory— Sean Cusick, Jennifer Taylor, DJ Axon, and Gianna the Vixen will also perform. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster. For more information, e-mail electric-lounge32@aol.com. See the story on p. 30 to find out more about Nashville’s own electronica scene.

—R.G.

Wheat The fragile pop confections dreamed by Wheat on last year’s Hope and Adams lie somewhere between the most languid moments of Lou Barlow and the dense arrangements of groups like Grandaddy and Mercury Rev. But in the end, this band’s inconspicuous mastery of melancholy tunes and detailed production puts them in a category apart from most practitioners of sedated indie-rock; it’s hard to fathom why these guys aren’t being crammed down AAA radio’s throat with the same gusto as Coldplay and Elliott Smith. See the magic of this group unfold at the Slow Bar with Brother Henry.

—W.T.

Stoik Oak Voted “best up-and-coming local band” by the readers of this very newspaper, this jam-inclined sextet modifies their earthy rock groove with the sort of electronic percussion touches that wouldn’t be out of place on an early ’80s funk record. Lead singer Sarah Buxton adds an element of the jazzy chanteuse that clearly differentiates Stoik Oak from the thousand other trippy-dippy acts that clutter up our nation’s rock clubs. They’re still a little long on wank and short on direct melodicism, but they have a distinctive style that explains their fervid local fan base, who will likely overload the Exit/In.

—N.M.

Mike Holloway Holloway has developed a solid local following with his gigs at such establishments as Blues Hideaway and Bourbon Street Blues & Boogie Bar. He’s a good entertainer and an above-average vocalist and instrumentalist, but without a current album he’s been largely ignored by the casual fan. That situation is about to change, as a new Holloway CD should be hitting the stores soon. He’ll debut some songs from that LP, plus others he’s done both as a leader and session musician, at a CD release party at 3rd & Lindsley.

—R.W.

Dancin’ in the District with Cricket A good lineup for this week’s free concert at Riverfront Park: Rodney Crowell, the Skynyrd-stomping Drive-By Truckers, Nashville’s fierce Rayon City Quartet, and The Groobees, who supplied the Dixie Chicks with their hit “Wide Open Spaces.” For more information, visit www.dancininthedistrict.com.

Friday, 22nd

BR549 BR549 have been a formidable live force for years now, but the transfer of that power to record has been elusive. The group’s new album, This Is BR549, sees them jumping to Sony’s Lucky Dog label in hopes of achieving moderate radio success. It should come easy with identifiable classics like “Play That Fast Thing (One More Time)” and “Psychic Lady,” but you never know. The country mainstream has never been as accepting of the band’s quirky yet traditional approach as the rest of the world. A stop at the Wildhorse Saloon this Friday may prove all the naysayers wrong. Let’s hope; if anyone deserves success, it’s these gentlemen.

—T.A.

Maynard Ferguson It has been more than four decades since Ferguson astonished listeners by almost blowing staid Stan Kenton off the bandstand during his time as lead trumpeter with the Birdland Dream Band. Since then, he’s had a brief moment in the fusion spotlight with his MF Horn material, but otherwise he has championed big bands and aided developing contemporary soloists. The personnel in his Big Bop Nouveau Band have been celebrated for their instrumental prowess and degraded for their choices in vocal selections. Ferguson can still match upper-register forays with any trumpeter, even though he’s now in his 60s. See for yourself as the big band comes to 3rd & Lindsley.

—R.W.

Chris Connelly & The Bells This Chicago art-rock supergroup—led by Revolting Cocks lead singer and former Ministry member Connelly—combines the cabaret side of David Bowie with the swirling poetic sides of Lou Reed and Roxy Music. They’re high on drama and epic pretension, and they should put on a mighty show at The End.

—N.M.

The Grumpies Described as “the Chipmunks on heroin,” Starkville, Miss.’s Grumpies play the sort of frantic skate-punk that makes you long to be 15 again. The group motors through Nashville at Indienet with the Candy-Ass-Pansie-Bastards.

The Baha Men “Nashville’s Biggest Luau” is being held at Nashville Shores, and these rap-reggae one-hit wonders will be in the house (or by the pool, as it were). If you ask them nice, maybe they’ll play “Who Let the Dogs Out?” If you ask them extra nice, maybe they won’t.

Saturday, 23rd

Scott Miller & The Commonwealth His days with the much-beloved V-roys behind him, Scott Miller has convened a new band of Dixie-coated rockers for his solo debut, Thus Always to Tyrants. Dabbling in hill-country stompers, fiery guitar-stoked smokers, Tom Petty-like mid-tempo pop-rock, and even overt ripoffs of Jeff Buckley (check out the opening riff of “Loving the Girl”), Miller and his latest sidemen are actively connecting the frayed threads of Southern music from the bayous to the cities to the suburbs and beyond. It’s a little bit of history and a heck of a lot of sweaty dive-bar dance music, and certainly worthy of checking out in its live reproduction at 12th & Porter. For more information on Miller, see the story on p. 34.

—N.M.

Cheetah Chrome One of the great living punk-rock sages, Cheetah Chrome did his time as a footsoldier in Rocket From the Tombs, and more notoriously, as lead guitarist with the Dead Boys. Now a little older, wiser, and recently married, Chrome has proven he still remembers how to rock properly; it’s pretty hard to argue with the guy who helped pen “Sonic Reducer” and “Ain’t Nothin’ to Do” when Green Day’s Billie Joe was in preschool. Catch Chrome and his band at the Springwater; the strong bill also boasts Slipshaft and the New Faggot Cunts.

—W.T.

Jefferson Street Festival Jefferson Street has been enjoying a business and artistic renaissance for several years, although it hasn’t always been acknowledged or publicized. Those unaware of recent developments can catch several highly talented performers appearing throughout the day at the Jefferson Street Festival, which begins at 10 a.m. and continues through 8 p.m. Performers scheduled to appear include playwright, talk-show host, actor, and vocalist Jeff Obafemi Carr, the wonderful blues vocalist Marion James, and Deford Bailey Jr. & Son, descendants of the great country performer Deford Bailey.

—R.W.

WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour National Audition Finals Heard nationally on more than 200 stations, including Nashville’s The Phoenix 93.7 FM at 6 p.m. Sundays, the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour gives a forum every week to unsigned acoustic artists across the country. Tonight, one lucky Nashville act will win a slot on the homey singer-songwriter showcase. The show’s host, singer/folklorist/banjo player Michael Johnathon, will perform an early set and preside over the auditions. The evening starts 7:30 p.m. at the Radio Cafe.

—J.R.

Cynthia Kaay Bennett Jazz vocalist Bennett is another among the many hard-working, skilled interpreters of pre-rock popular songs and standards that have a devoted audience and keep toiling despite minimal material rewards or commercial success. Bennett will debut a new release at the end of the month, but fans can get a sample of her material this Saturday afternoon when she appears as the weekly headliner in the Jazz@Bellevue Center performance series.

—R.W.

Backstreet Boys They may be in the shadow of ♦NSync now, but the original late-’90s boy band isn’t quite ready to give up the screams of their remaining teen girl and gay male fans. They’ll be stepping in time at Gaylord Entertainment Center.

Paul Thorn This former boxer turned country-rock sideman stops off at 3rd & Lindsley for a night of his solo work—slick, soulful songs that are entertaining, if overreliant on rootsy clichés and rural stereotypes.

Hangman’s Daughter Boasting a glammier hard-rock sound—perhaps as a result of working up new material with producer Scott Rouse, who’s manned the board for everyone from Aztec Camera to New Kids on the Block—the quartet fronted by cherry-bomb vocalist Sherrie Phillips resurfaces with a headlining gig at the Exit/In. Opening act is Stateside.

Sunday, 24th

Bill Lloyd Lloyd’s new album, All in One Place, is an odds-and-sods grab-bag of covers, one-off compilation tunes, and other rarities. But because Lloyd’s reverence for lush, punchy guitar-pop has remained both keen and constant, the collection holds together surprisingly well—especially if taken as the artist’s statement of kinship with cult heroes like The Raspberries, Todd Rundgren, Harry Nilsson, and Badfinger, all of whom he covers with aplomb. Local hero Lloyd celebrates the record’s release at a broadcast of WRLT-100.1 FM’s Nashville Sunday Night at 3rd & Lindsley with opening act Deep Blue Something.

—J.R.

Tuesday, 26th-Wednesday, 27th

Terry Eldredge & Bobby Nicholas Benefit Show If you’re looking for a survey of the best in bluegrass, from Opry stars to as-yet-unknowns, get yourself up to the Gallatin Civic Center on June 26 and 27; they’ll all be there to rally around popular bluegrass sidemen Terry Eldredge and Bobby Nicholas, injured in an auto accident less than two months ago. There are way too many names on the bill to list them all, but the roster includes area residents such as Eldredge’s former (Osborne Brothers) and current (The Sidemen, Larry Cordle) bands and legends Jim & Jesse, Mac Wiseman, and Jimmy Martin, as well as some prominent out-of-towners like J. D. Crowe, the Lonesome River Band, and Dale Ann Bradley. There’s a silent auction too, with instruments, memorabilia, and a lot more up for sale. All in all, it’s bound to be Nashville’s biggest bluegrass event of the year.

—J.W.

Wednesday, 27th

Paul Burch & the WPA Ballclub Burch’s new LP Last of My Kind is the best country record to come out of Nashville so far this year. What, you haven’t heard it on the radio? Imagine that. Just remember, folks: They didn’t play O Brother, Where Art Thou? either—and this rambunctious old-time country album, conceived as a companion piece to Tony Earley’s beautifully evocative novel Jim the Boy, is the first record we’d recommend to O Brother fans wanting something in a similar vein. Since Burch is playing his record-release party at the city’s hottest venue of the moment, East Nashville’s Slow Bar, plan to get there early if you don’t want to watch the show from the Woodland Street sidewalk.

—J.R.

Diana Krall w/The Nashville Symphony Orchestra We’re still bragging about the time we saw Krall at Caffe Milano (not Gibson’s Caffe Milano) on the eve of her ascendance to the jazz charts’ ionosphere. Even then, her taste in standards and her chops were top-notch, and it didn’t hurt that she had the glamorous look of a martini-sipping sophisticate on a ’50s record jacket. Sadly, your chances of seeing the Canadian singer/pianist in a small room are about as likely now as, say, seeing Ornette Coleman at The Sutler. But that’s no reason not to take advantage of her Music City date with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra at TPAC’s Jackson Hall. Dibs on the frim-fram sauce; the chafafa is all yours, bub.

—J.R.

Duane Jarvis Certified Miracle, the new Slewfoot Records release from this revered roots-rocker, has already been released in Europe to rave reviews—the German edition of Rolling Stone gave it a four-star salute. The album, recorded at George Bradfute’s Tone Chaparral, features a host of Nashville luminaries, including Richard Bennett, Buddy Miller, Joy Lynn White, and Steve Fishell. The ax-wielding singer-songwriter’s music is a down-home blend of twangy country, blues, and rock ’n’ roll, and lyrically he balances sincere explorations of emotion and vulnerability with witty, lighthearted romps. Help ring in the stateside release of his new album at what Jarvis says will be “a celebration of East Nashville music” (featuring none other than across-the-Cumberland drummer—and Mighty King of Love—Phil Lee) at 7:30 p.m. at the Radio Cafe. Jarvis will also perform on Billy Block’s Western Beat show at Exit/In the previous evening at 9 p.m.

—J.S.

Film

Three Minutes From Opryland This feature-length documentary by Nashville filmmaker Michael Carter explores an incredibly rich subject: the Middle Tennessee wrestling circuit of fairgrounds, meeting halls, and cinder-block auditoriums, and the fans who show up to heckle and raise hell at every event. Shot without voiceover narration, in ’60s cinema verité tradition, Carter’s film alternates still photographs by Joe Shay with stark black-and-white footage of the matches, the wrestlers offstage, and rabid fans hollering threats or shooting the breeze outside the venues. In the film’s unpolished current form, some of Carter’s ideas need fine-tuning: interspersed quotes from Erich Fromm on the function of ritual and spectacle come off as pretentious, and the many title cards fail to impose a structure on the rambling material. That said, this is the most ambitious and promising film we’ve seen in a long time by a local director, and if Carter can get the funds he needs to complete it, his movie will do Nashville proud on the festival circuit. Carter and Shay will host a simultaneous screening and photographic exhibit at the Fugitive Art Center 7 p.m. Saturday. (See the Art pick below.)

—J.R.

The Gleaners and I Agnes Varda, the only woman among the pioneering directors of France’s Nouvelle Vague, directed this acclaimed documentary about her homeland’s “gleaners”—scavengers who pick through harvested fields and junk heaps in search of food and tossed-away treasures. The film starts Friday at the Belcourt; see the review on pg. 37.

—J.R.

Chopper The exploits of Mark “Chopper” Read (Eric Bana), a boastful real-life Australian con with a gruesome string of murders to his name and a penchant for telling a good story. The violent, well-reviewed Australian crime drama opens Friday at Green Hills, which also starts the French thriller With a Friend Like Harry and the Nabokov adaptation The Luzhin Defence with John Turturro and Emily Watson. See our Movie Clock and Film Listings for more information.

—J.R.

The Fast and the Furious A rip-roaring 1950s hot-rod movie, gone 21st-century with a throbbing techno beat, but with the genre conventions otherwise intact (including the title). Paul Walker is an undercover cop who gets too close to illegal street racer Vin Diesel and his sister Jordana Brewster; with its dynamite stunt work, comic-book colors, and tooth-rattling racing scenes, this is the first action movie we’ve seen all year that lived up to our hopes. The movie starts Friday; see the review in our Film Listings. Also starting Friday: Eddie Murphy in Doctor Dolittle 2.

—J.R.

DVD/Video

All That Heaven Allows/Written on the Wind Was director Douglas Sirk a subversive ironist who exaggerated his extravagant melodramas for satiric effect, or was he simply the most skilled maker of soap operas ever to work in Hollywood? The answer is more complex than either extreme suggests, and in these two Technicolor marvels, he turned the glossy Tinseltown sudser into indigenous art. In 1955’s All That Heaven Allows, widow Jane Wyman romances young iconoclast Rock Hudson, to the shame of her grown children; the impeccably composed frames come to resemble a cage as Wyman chafes under pressure to give up her lover and conform to Fifties normalcy. Better still is 1957’s Written on the Wind, a thrashing fever fit of repressed desires, in which oil tycoon Robert Stack competes with (or is it for?) his studly longtime buddy Hudson while slutty sis Dorothy Malone sashays in the background. It belongs on any list of the great American movies—and Sirk made movies that are even better. Criterion, the company you’d hope would do these films, provided extras ranging from a BBC documentary to an appreciation by Sirk’s admirer Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

—J.R.

Diary of a Chambermaid Not as well-known as the Buñuel films that followed it, the director’s 1964 film ushered in a succession of late-career gems, including Belle de Jour, Tristana, and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie. This adaptation of Octave Mirbeau’s novel (previously filmed by Jean Renoir) places maidservant Jeanne Moreau in a perverse household of frigid wives, shoe fetishists, and Fascist sympathizers in 1939 France. Criterion’s edition, based on the recent Rialto reissue, includes a text interview with the director and a video interview with screenwriter Jean-Claude Carriere.

—J.R.

Kiss Me Deadly Mickey Spillane’s thug hero, Mike Hammer (Ralph Meeker), slugs his way through a sinister underworld in search of the Big Whatsit—a Pandora’s box that contains a whiff of Armageddon. One of the seamiest and most startling of all ’50s noirs, Robert Aldrich’s brass-knuckled 1955 masterpiece (whose influence can be felt as far afield as Repo Man and Pulp Fiction) arrives on DVD with scant extras—just the movie, smack in the kisser.

—J.R.

Sweet Smell of Success “You’re a cookie full of arsenic,” says ruthless columnist J.J. Hunsecker (Burt Lancaster) to his kiss-ass press-agent flunky Sidney Falco (Tony Curtis). “Watch me make a 50-yard dash with no legs,” Sidney crows to an associate, cooking up grift. Lancaster and especially Curtis are in top form in Alexander Mackendrick’s dynamic 1957 melodrama of Manhattan nightlife, given hard-boiled poetry by a pungent Clifford Odets-Ernest Lehman script. The movie makes its DVD debut this week—sadly, with no extras but the trailer.

—J.R.

Hard Core Logo Previously lost in the limbo of undistributed Miramax acquisitions, this 1998 Canadian punk-rock comedy—one of the best films of that year—finally comes to home video. Similar to Spinal Tap in structure if not intent, this mockumentary follows the reunion tour of a punk band whose lead singer is a charismatic ideologue and whose guitarist is about to join a popular alt-rock combo. Their arguments across the frozen backwaters of Western Canada make for an interesting distillation of punk’s self-destructive “no sellout” ethos. The jokes are funny, the performances (acting and musical) are scintillating, and the ending is a stunner.

—N.M.

The Apartment An apex in a career full of apexes, Billy Wilder’s Oscar-winning 1960 comedy The Apartment remains a funny, humane satire of the ease with which morals can be shrugged off in the pursuit of corporate success. Jack Lemmon is a lovable lug, Fred MacMurray is an oily authority figure, Shirley MacLaine is a sympathetic, corrupted naïf, and pre-Kennedy-era New York City is the bleak, featureless landscape in which the romantic follies of the three characters play out. It’s witty, sophisticated, biting, and it’s newly available on DVD (with no extras save a trailer, alas).

—N.M.

My Man Godfrey One of the best screwball comedies of the ’30s—marred by years of shabby public domain video editions—gets the Criterion treatment, in a DVD that includes commentary by film historian Bob Gilpin, outtakes from the cutting room floor (rare for such an old film), and the radio adaptation that also featured stars Carole Lombard (as a flighty society dame) and William Powell (as the tramp-turned-butler who teaches her about the real value of things).

—N.M.

Art

Fugitive Art Center You could call it an “Art Smackdown” when this alternative art space presents a photographic look at the wrestling subculture of Music City, June 23-July 27. The show features Michael Carter’s documentary 3 Minutes From Opryland (see the Film pick above) and 40 photos by Joe Shay that make the case for wrestling as theater art. Shay’s shots focus on the audience and their relationship to a spectacle that provides an emotional release for them and also binds them together as a community. The opening reception, 7-9 p.m. June 23, features a 7:30 p.m. screening of Carter’s film.

—A.W.

Tennessee State Museum Jim Hoobler, curator of art and architecture at the state museum, leads visitors on a tour of “A Brush With History: Paintings From the National Portrait Gallery,” 2 p.m. June 24. Of special interest to Tennesseans are the nine portraits in the show that feature subjects who have historical connections with the state, including Davy Crockett, Sequoyah, Mark Twain, and Thomas Hart Benton. The guided tour and admission to the exhibition are free.

—A.W.

4th and Main Restaurant In January, the state Legislature issued a resolution proclaiming Cheatham County artist H.R. Lovell “Tennessee’s Official Artist-in-Residence.” In conferring that title, the state recognized Lovell’s watercolor and tempera paintings as expressing “the spirit and assets of Tennessee.” You can see what that means in this exhibition of nostalgic rural scenes, organized by the James-Ben Studio and Gallery of Franklin, that includes the artist’s newest work “Christmas.” You can also meet the artist at a special reception 4-6 p.m. June 24 and witness Sen. Doug Jackson present Lovell with the official artist-in residence proclamation.

—A.W.

Knoxville Museum of Art If you’re up for an art road-trip that’s a blast from the past, check out “The Prints of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again,” on view at Knoxville’s art museum through Sept. 9. The show comes from The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh (the artist’s hometown) and features 50 prints created from the 1960s to the 1980s. Among the special programs planned for this summer is a screening of the definitive documentary on the artist, Superstar: The Life and Times of Andy Warhol, 2 p.m. June 24. For more information, call (865) 525-6101 or go to www.knoxart.org.

—A.W.

Books

Steve Earle Earle will not personalize signatures, sign more than one CD, or be available for any photographs except those taken from a designated area when he appears at Borders on June 25 at 6 p.m. to launch his book of short stories, Doghouse Roses. While the store’s promo doesn’t say anything about pat-downs at the entrance or memorizing the number of your place in line, Borders’ rules for attendance perversely evoke some of Earle’s songs about prison, “Ellis Unit One” being perhaps the best known of these. More reader-friendly borders, so to speak, are being crossed a great deal lately, most notably in Rosanne Cash’s Songs Without Rhyme, an anthology of singer-songwriters’ prose on the creative process. Cash’s book has thus far garnered better reviews than Doghouse Roses, but the latter is bound to be a big hit here in Music City, the subject for some of Earle’s best stories.

—D.B.

Hatch Show Print Minnie Pearl once said, “All you needed was a Hatch poster to let folks know the Opry was coming to town.” Clearly, she wasn’t the first—or last—entertainer to see the positive results of this Nashville letterpress printing operation, started by brothers Herbert and Charles Hatch in 1879. From vaudeville artists and professional wrestlers to stars of the Grand Ole Opry and modern-day rockers, the shop has created eye-catching “show prints” for them all. Needless to say, there’s quite a bit of history tied to the business—which continues to thrive today on Lower Broadway—and that history has itself been committed to print by three Nashvillians: current Hatch manager Jim Sherraden, Elek Horvath, and Paul Kingsbury. With over 175 illustrations, heavy paper stock, and a book jacket that unfolds into an original poster, their coffee-table narrative entitled Hatch Show Print: The History of a Great American Poster Shop beautifully captures the mix of nostalgia and superb design aesthetic that has become the printing company’s calling card. The three authors discuss and sign the book 6 p.m. June 25 at Davis-Kidd.

—D.R.B.

Anna Maxted While Bridget Jones’ ongoing Austenesque struggles with postmodern romance are charming, as well as intelligently chronicled, creator Helen Fielding hasn’t yet walloped her heroine with the losses that lend a darkness to the search for love. So hurrah for Anna Maxted, whose in-print doppelgänger Helen Bradshaw charmed her way to five printings in last year’s Getting Over It, a novel that is given depth by a family catastrophe. Maxted’s new book, Running in Heels, has already gained additional fans for the British author, a Cambridge graduate with journalism credits ranging from The Jewish Chronicle to the U.K. edition of Cosmopolitan. Maxted will be at Davis-Kidd on June 26 at 7 p.m. for a reading and signing.

—D.B.

Michael Parker In the South, literature is the academic cash crop. Southern writers have become ambassadors of the written word. Beyond the sometimes dewy prose and adjective-filled phrases lies a talent for objectivity and insight. Towns Without Rivers, Parker’s third novel and the sequel to his first (Hello Down There), exemplifies this skill. Parker offers a thoughtful narrative whose voice, though certainly Southern, carries an appeal that is refreshingly universal. Parker will be signing 6 p.m. June 27 at Davis-Kidd.

—A.M.

Comedy

Shane Caldwell The former Sylvan Brother toasts the release of his solo comedy CD Drive Time with a show at TPAC’s Johnson Theatre 8 p.m. June 27.

Picks written by Todd Anderson, Diann Blakely, Doug R. Brumley, Rebekah Gleaves, Angela Messina, Noel Murray, Jim Ridley, Jack Silverman, William Tyler, Jon Weisberger, Angela Wibking, and Ron Wynn.

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