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Love/Hate Mail, June 28, 2012

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Southern comfort

You left out the best part of The Southern, the drink special "Ribbons and Roses" — can of PBR with a shot of Four Roses bourbon on the side ("At The Southern, Tom Morales & Co. bring down-home flavor downtown," June 21). $6 — unbeatable.

Jacob Brown
Nashville


Parental guidance suggested

I am so pleased that Chely is happy ("Chely Wright: The Scene Interview," June 14). Where I exit off the "equality in marriage rights" path, is in the IVF procreation and stepparent adoption of children, other than orphans, to same-sex couples. You do not have the right to deliberately deny another human being the rearing of their biological parent.

Tony Gottlieb
Nashville


Knuckleballer holiday

I almost didn't read it ("Dickey's Deliverance," June 21). The article began as if it were instructions for assembling a child's bicycle on Christmas Eve. Then to top it off, it begins with "K-i-n-e-s..." — well, a rough beginning for a sport fan! I persevered, though, and sure enough when J.R. got to "batters chasing it like drunk fishermen trying to snag a minnow barehanded" — he had me. I guess I spent more time at the lake than striving to get a master's involving biomechanics. However, from experience I used to chuckle at a batter's deer-in-the-headlights reaction and subsequent hip-hop-like body movements when I let loose of a well-executed knuckler. R.A. Dickey has no doubt seen that too and will go down in baseball history as one of the best. Many thanks to J.R. for spotlighting Dickey's current success.

J. Anderson
Nashville


Radio is the sound salvation

I came across your article passing through Nashville on my way back to East Lansing, Mich., after my time at Bonnaroo ("What's Left of the Dial," June 7). Though it probably makes me incredibly biased, I am writing as a college music director to thank you for writing that article. Working in college radio has jump-started my opportunities post-grad, and I also believe college stations provide education to the community that no classical station ever could.

I really appreciate the article and sure hope the FCC decides to block the sale. The loss of college stations on FM frequencies is a detriment to the music community and all students who could potentially be involved.

Jesse Wiza
Music director, WDBM-FM
East Lansing, Mich.


Race to the bottom

"We have the 11th highest HIV infection rate in the nation among those ages 13-19 ... " ("No Sex, No Education," May 10).

I get the Tennessee legislature's goal: They want Tennessee to [be] No. 1 in something at least, so No. 1 in HIV infections is attainable, since we will never be No. 1 in, say, education.

Curt Porter
Nashville


Friedmann fighting the good fight

[Alex] Friedmann has worked for years against sexual assaults in both public and for-profit prisons in conjunction with advocates such as those at Standing Together Against Rape ("An activist fights to make CCA more transparent — by joining the ranks of its stockholders," May 17).

He has also worked against physical abuse, the looting of public treasuries by slimy outfits such as CCA, the revolving door that has corrupted the relationship between the government and the provider, and the endless failures of CCA to meet its contractual obligations.

A person would be hard put to find anyone, in fact, who has been more conscientious than Friedmann in holding the corporation's feet to the fire.

He is performing the worthy function of public watchdog, admirable given the almost ubiquitous failure of contract monitors to ensure efficacious and professional for-profit operations at the federal, state and municipal levels.

The CCA prison at Otter Creek, whose operations were referred to in the article, maintained a pervasive atmosphere over many years of sexual harassment. Even the chaplain was indicted for participating in the abuse. But the sexual exploitation extends even to CCA management's failure to protect its own employees in the workplace. Dozens of women successfully sued CCA for sexual abuse and harassment at its Crowley County, Colo., prison, the last 21 receiving a settlement of $1.3 million in a class-action case.

Frank Smith
Bluff City, Kan.


Not one penny for turnip greens

I read that Mayor Dean wants to increase our taxes to fulfill his "vision for Nashville." I also read that he wants to use part of that tax to increase the subsidy to the Farmers' Market from about $79,000 per year to $350,000 per year (almost $30,000 per month!). Am I correct in thinking that the Farmers' Market is a private enterprise? Why are we subsidizing this venture, which has managed to chase away most of the interesting restaurants it once had? And the "remodeling" project was a joke. We used to go there because there were interesting stores and restaurant. They took them all out. I don't see any improvement.  How much did that cost the taxpayers?

How many other private enterprises are we subsidizing? How about preparing a list with the amount of each subsidy. Divide the total by the number of residents in Davidson County, and then send each of us a letter asking for a check for our "share." I'll bet you'd get some interesting responses. I think the mayor should keep his "vision" focused on real government business, not subsidies for special interests.

Harry Dale
Nashville

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