Silent Flood: Why Isn't Nashville Talking About National Disasters?

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President Barack Obama is joined by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, left, and Memphis Mayor A.C. Wharton, center, for a meeting with first responders, volunteers and Memphis area families impacted by flooding in Memphis, Tenn., May 16, 2011
  • Official White House Photo:Pete Souza
  • President Barack Obama is joined by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, left, and Memphis Mayor A.C. Wharton, center, for a meeting with first responders, volunteers and Memphis area families impacted by flooding in Memphis, Tenn., May 16, 2011

In the wake of last year's floods in Nashville, there was a sense that the rest of the nation did not know what had happened here. Many Nashvillians perceived that the national media and our network of friends were not tuned in to either our calamity or our comeback.

I get the same feeling, in reverse, about the flooding that's been happening in the rest of the country for the past few weeks. Sure, we hear snippets from the media — about massive amounts of water that the Corps sends into and over small towns, to keep larger cities like New Orleans safe; about nuclear power plants on the edge of closure as nearby dry land disappears; about levees failing up and down the Mississippi — but it's not around-the-office talk, and it's not on our front pages.

From the looks of it, the flooding is an ongoing national disaster. FEMA's map of recent emergency and disaster declarations, flood-related and otherwise, includes most of the country.

I'm just not hearing a lot about it from Music City. Surely we're not unique in this, but considering what we went through last year, you might have expected, I don't know, at least a T-shirt.

John Lamb is the editor of HispanicNashville.com

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