Former Scene Editor Liz Garrigan Gets a Shout-Out at The Atlantic

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We miss quite a few of our former co-workers here at the Scene, but perhaps none more than former editor Liz Garrigan. Sure, one of the things we miss the most is making fun of her pop-culture cluelessness — her mispronunciation of Beyoncé is the stuff of legend around here.

But more than that, we miss her sharp wit, shrewd editorial skills, boisterous laugh and insightful writing. Fortunately, we still get to read her very entertaining Tumblr blog, even though she moved to Paris. (France, not Tennessee. Or Texas.)

She was also known around here for her extremely low tolerance for bullshit, as evidenced by her recent critique of Pamela Druckerman's extremely popular book Bringing Up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting. Apparently, she struck a chord with Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry. In a piece published yesterday on The Atlantic website— "The Truth About French Parenting (And I Would Know)" — Gobry writes:

I can only encourage you to read an excellent blog post by Liz Garrigan, an American expat living in Paris. I feel compelled to excerpt liberally:

And here's the excerpt form Garrigan's piece:


[French parents] are much more willing to wage emotional and physical warfare with their children than my friends and I are (and remember, I'm representing not an American perspective but an international one). It obviously can't be said that all French parents are the same, but what passes for acceptable here as a means to make children compliant is unacceptable to every expat parent, no matter the nationality, I know.

I've seen a woman on the sidewalk grab a teen's hair and pull him to her violently, a woman beating her son in the car seat to make him shut up, and perhaps more damning than anything else, I've seen French parents simply ignoring their children. Entire coffee klatschs here are dedicated to recounting deplorable French parenting we've witnessed.

There is no doubt that French children are more behaved when they are being judged by their behavior than their American counterparts. French children know their parents don't mind exercising very unpleasant means of punishment should they fail to mind their Ps and Qs.

Be sure to check out Liz's blog, I Am Carla Bruni's Neighbor. Her series on inappropriate park shoes is particularly amusing.

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