Installation View: To See as Artists See at The Frist

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Yesterday I went to The Frist's media preview of their new exhibition, To See as Artists See: American Art From the Phillips Collection, which opens tonight and remains on view through May 6. I wrote a little about the show in this week's Scene, but yesterday's media preview was the first chance I'd had to really see just what had made its way from The Phillips Collection to Nashville. It's a pretty broad selection — American art changed by leaps and bounds from the 1850s to 1960 — and there are close to 100 paintings (and a Calder!) in the exhibit.

I took a few photographs and tried to pay attention while the curator, Susan Frank, gave an abridged history of more than 100 years of American art. She's giving a lecture on the collection at The Frist's auditorium today at noon, so if you want to know more, you know where to go.

Note the freakishly blue February sky
  • Note the freakishly blue February sky


The piece that Phillips started his collection with
  • The piece that Phillips started his collection with


Rockwell Kents Burial of a Young Man is spooky and made me think about how someones death can feel like the end of the world
  • Rockwell Kent's "Burial of a Young Man" is spooky and made me think about how someone's death can feel like the end of the world


Two paintings by Georgia OKeeffe
  • Two paintings by Georgia O'Keeffe


The colors of Augustus Vincent Tacks gorgeous Aspiration reminded me of Rodartes Spring 2012 collection
  • The colors of Augustus Vincent Tack's gorgeous "Aspiration" reminded me of Rodarte's Spring 2012 collection.


Edward Hopper painting Phillips bought for $600
  • Edward Hopper painting Phillips bought for $600


Sad clown
  • Sad clown in the corner


Plumes by Walt Kuhn made me think of Annie Lennox
  • "Plumes" by Walt Kuhn made me think of Annie Lennox


Panels from Jacob Lawrences Migrations series. Joe Nolan pointed out the wall tag that said that the Phillips Collection owns 30 out of this series — the odd numbered ones. The MoMA owns the evens.
  • Panels from Jacob Lawrence's "Migrations" series. Joe Nolan pointed out the wall tag that said that the Phillips Collection owns 30 out of this series — the odd numbered ones. The MoMA owns the evens.


Another shot of the Jacob Lawrences
  • Another shot of the Jacob Lawrences. (I love him.)


Gallery view
  • Gallery view


A second attempt to capture the movement/lines/airiness of the Calder piece.
  • Alexander Calder is another favorite. Unfortunately my camera couldn't get a decent shot.


Gallery view
  • Gallery view


Ha!
  • Crib mobile found art?


Blue Cafe by Stuart Davis. A very French piece for an American art exhibit.
  • "Blue Cafe" by Stuart Davis. A very French piece for an American art exhibit.


Phillips Collection curator Susan Frank is explaining that Stuart Davis painted an eggbeater, an electric fan and a rubber glove for a year, and this painting was the end result of that process. At that point I decided that Cubism is probably connected to the advent of amphetamine use.
  • Phillips Collection curator Susan Frank is explaining that Stuart Davis painted an eggbeater, an electric fan and a rubber glove for a year, and this painting was the end result of that process. At this point I decided that Cubism is probably connected to the advent of amphetamine use.


An underwhelming Rothko
  • An underwhelming Rothko


Natives Return, by Philip Guston. This was probably my favorite piece out of the entire collection. The bright colors overwhelmed by white paint reminded me of the Allison Schulnik Mound video that I posted last month.
  • "Native's Return," by Philip Guston. This was probably my favorite piece out of the entire collection. The bright colors overwhelmed by white paint reminded me of the Allison Schulnik "Mound" video that I posted last month.

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